Category Archives: Students

MyCoyote Portal

Hands typing on a keyboard with text reading MyCoyoteSeamless navigation and a visually relevant user interface remain the primary goals for Administrative Computing and Business Intelligence.  ACBI is constantly maintaining and improving the MyCoyote portal needed to browse through essential applications and programs as CSUSB students, faculty, and staff.

What’s new in MyCoyote?

The most recent additions to the MyCoyote Portal are Zoom and Qualtrics. Some of us may have already had experience with these programs, yet in regards to user interface accessibility they remain the most recent. Placing these icons in front of users where they have easy access has lead to greater utilization outside of the classroom.  The increased use of these applications has given students the tools needed to expand upon their academics, along with faculty to experiment with new ways to teach their courses.

What’s on the horizon?

A discussion is taking place regarding the visual aspects of the current portal and ways to improve upon its navigational tabs. The concept of having a dashboard layout remains in consideration, allowing a change to the links and information that is currently portrayed. Such an idea can be suited for both students and faculty, providing an instant snapshot of data in the means of, enrollment, finances, holds, registration dates, current appointments, wait-list, and more.

Important Notes

With the inevitable changes that are underway with tuition, scheduling, semester conversion, and more, ACBI reminds us all to make sure we update our personal contact information through the MyCoyote Portal.

Installing Office 365 For a Mac

For Faculty & Staff

To install Office 365, log into the CSUSB OWA wesbite using your CoyoteID@csusb.edu.

For Students

To install Office 365, log into the Office 365 Portal. Type in your CoyoteID number using your CoyoteID@csusb.edu login.

You will now be at the Office 365 Page. Please click on the Gear icon and select “Settings”

Mac 365 - 1

From the Settings area, select “Office 365”

Mac 365 - 2

Select “Software”

Mac 365 - 3

Press “Install”

Mac 365 - 4

 

ATI Classroom Technologies

By offering tATI CLechnical support and new advancements, ATI Classroom Technologies stands to enhance the quality CSUSB student’s experience within the classroom. More commonly seen with the upkeep and maintenance of the classroom’s projection systems, ATI-CT expands their knowledge by being able to work with various operating systems and equipment that’s both new and old. Currently, over 200 classrooms are serviced within CSUSB utilizing a vast set of technology from VCR’s to Overhead Projectors and ultimately to High Definition projection.

Video Switches

As seen in many of the colleges in CSUSB, the move to HD projection is growing more standardized with the inclusion of new video switches. No longer is tedious hardwiring needed to switch between projected devices and all can now be done within one control panel. The control panels themselves have been built to ensure easy operation for any faculty member that might be unfamiliar to this new technology. These new switches also have the benefit of being run with new cabling. CAT5/CAT6 cables now run through the new video switches, essentially improving the devices range and image quality.

Goals

Currently, the goal for ATI-CL is to upgrade older classrooms in the move from analog to digital technology. Along with the campus-wide upgrade, the idea of creating a universal workplace would be beneficial to not only future faculty but students as well. What this involves is creating a standardization of classroom devices which would work with student’s portable technology in a seamless fashion. Currently, Microsoft office and Apple remain the norms for academic software yet conflicts arise when attempting to incorporating these together. Eventually, ATI-CL hopes to be able to elaborate on alternative methods to make student and campus technology universal and seamless to operate. Whether this is seen with new academic software or projection devices or monitors, the fact remains the notion to make campus technology the same for all will only benefit all.

Along with the new video switches, ATI Classroom Technologies has improved upon classes with:

  • Brighter Projectors, higher lumens and less glare.
  • New document cameras.
  • Portable scanners and projectors.
  • Classroom customization – Apple TV.

ATI Classroom Technologies Technical Support is always there for you!

Monday – Thursday  8:00 am – 9:00 pm

Friday 8:00 am – 5:00 pm.

Located in PL046

VETI Success – Department of Biology

20170110_100551Dr. Michael Chao, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Biology within CSUSB recently upgraded the department’s biological imaging capabilities with the acquisition of their new laser scanning confocal microscope. By utilizing the VETI grant, the Biology department has new gained a new piece of equipment to not only help students learn within such subjects as Cell Physiology and Microscopy, but to further assist in the faculty-led student research being done within the campus as well.

The laser scanning confocal microscope expands upon the capabilities of traditional microscopes. Unlike bright-field microscopes, the confocal microscope uses multiple lasers to scan and capture images of fluorescently-labeled molecules inside cells. Unlike the traditional method of staining specimens with vital dyes, this florescence imaging allows scientists to visualize individual biological molecules at close to 1000x magnification and a resolution of a few hundred nanometers.

Although an expensive piece of equipment, students are able to utilize the microscope after receiving appropriate training and supervision by the faculty. The funds granted to the Biology department have done much to expand upon the curriculum and research at CSUSB. As Dr. Michael Chao stated during our interview: “The entire process we went through with the VETI Grant was a great experience; they not only worked with our department but encouraged us along the way.”

ATI – Instructional Design

ati-instructional-design-01

The Instructional Designers within the Academic Technologies and Innovation Department (ATI) of the ITS Division offer high-quality professional development, pedagogical, and course design/redesign with technology support. Their team of experienced designers can help you transition your face-to-face course to a fully online or blended learning course, re-design an existing course, or simply provide you with best practices in course design, recommended technologies, and available resources.

Consultations

If you are looking to make a change to your face-to-face, hybrid, or fully online course but are uncertain what you want that change to look like, schedule a consultation with our team!  We can help you identify new and exciting technologies to bring into your classroom or rethink a course activity to increase student motivation.

Course Design/Redesign

Instructional Designers offer high-quality course design/redesign with technology support. Our team of experienced designers can help you transition your face-to-face course to a fully online or blended learning course, re-design an existing course, or simply provide you with best practices in course design, recommended technologies, and available resources.

Online Pedagogy

Teaching online presents many new and exciting challenges for instructors who are used to a brick-and-mortar, face-to-face environment. With the help of an expert instructional designer, instructors can take advantage of the opportunity to learn how online and face-to-face pedagogy differ and how to prepare an online course accordingly. Our designers offer practical advice for the pursuit of pedagogical goals by providing best practice tips and help finding the perfect piece of technology to fit your needs and budget.

Program Development

Program development includes full course design services for all courses in a program, including collaboration with program directors and department chairs to ensure program goals are met.  Courses developed as part of a program will ensure consistency across courses and can include coordinated activities and assessments.

QM/QOLT Sample Course Template

The CSUSB Blackboard Quality Matters (QM) /Quality Online Learning and Teaching (QOLT) sample course template provides faculty with a foundation to build a quality online course. For detailed information, download the Blackboard QM/QOLT Sample Course Template Guide or complete a service request form.

Need Help? Request a Service

How’s Your Cyber Hygiene?|Keep Private Information Private

Brought to you by The Cyber Security Club.

keep-private-information-privateWhen it comes to online privacy most students, especially millennials, are oblivious to the settings of their accounts, passwords, and apps that require location set ups. They are less mindful of the posts they put up and how it can affect them afterwards. Even if there are no specifics to the time just the name of the event and location can suffice or even photos of tickets of the event is dangerous in itself.

Be mindful of what you post online and the settings on your social media and apps. The friends one has on the social media is also important to be careful with. It is important to know who you add and are inviting to see your information because remember all information on social media is public. According Andra Zaharia, a Security Specialist at Heimdal Security, close to 600,000 Facebook accounts are compromised each day.

 

ITS Information Security and Emerging Technologies

its_blog-posts-01The Information Security and Emerging Technologies department does much to protect campus users from online threats. It is here where the IS&ET oversees our network’s traffic, secures all login credentials, instills internal policies, and provides continued education with online safety.

In recognition of National Cyber Security Awareness Month, the IS&ET alongside the Information Security Club and Coyote Advertising have created the “How’s Your Cyber Hygiene?” campaign to spread awareness to the entire campus of the many threats online. By utilizing social media along with various screens throughout campus, the campaign has brought with it a means to provide people with the basics in cyber security protection. Some of these examples include insight in Email threats, Privacy protection, and secure links and pathways (see example below).

By training those within the ITS department, exercises and scenarios have been set to prepare staff in facing online threats. Such examples are seen with false emails in disguise as phishing attempts, showing staff firsthand the attempts hackers make to tap into one’s privacy. Eventually, such measures will be taken beyond the ITS department and staff, giving everyone a first-hand taste of what it is like to be exposed to a phishing attack. Although done with no intent on harm, these exercises will lead people to a safe location which will inform them of what just occurred.

Alongside the cyber awareness campaign and the continued education, the IS&ET department has provided a link to common practices one should be aware of with internet used. Further insight and examples can be found on http://iso.csusb.edu/practices.

For more information, visit http://iso.csusb.edu/ or contact:

Information Security & Emerging Technologies
California State University, San Bernardino
John M. Pfau Library Room 2006 (PL-2006)
5500 University Parkway
San Bernardino, CA 92407
(909) 537-7262

How’s Your Cyber Hygiene?|Look for the “S” in HTTPS

Brought to you by The Information Security Club.

look-for-the-s-in-httpsThere are a few do’s and don’ts when it comes to browsing the internet. Most remain obvious yet one of which has been a standard since its inception. The “S” in HTTPS. Not many people know this but the “S” actually stands for secure. As a whole this in most cases should be a standard for most sites yet it remains unknown. Given the fact that most browsing involves some degree of transaction or personal projection of oneself, it’s important that we all become aware of the “S” in HTTPS.

An example of this can be seen with the website for Nocturnal Wonderland, the annual EDM (Electronic Dance Music) concert which drives youths towards its large rave scene. When looked at closely one can see the lack of HTTPS within the web address. Especially when dealing with an online purchase the importance of this security measure remains essential. In regards to millennials, the main issue 18 – 29-year old’s deal with is with identify theft.

How’s Your Cyber Hygiene?|Think Before You Click

Brought to you by The Information Security Club.

Pop up ads, redirections, andthink-before-you-click fake websites are just a few of the detours taken when coming across false and misleading links. Spoofed websites and emails try to fool you into clicking bad links. Stop. Think. When on a search engine, take caution as to where your results lead you. Questionable domain names and extensions are key indicators that can save you from unsecure sites and prying eyes.

Be especially cautious when following links within your social media accounts. Online quizzes, articles, and contest entries can lie as hidden traps to lure people into dangerous sites. Ever important are the now condensed or “tiny” URLs which are responsible for leading people astray. Millennials (ages 18 – 33) are the most likely age group to fall victim to cyber crime! Remain vigilant and on the lookout for suspicious site extensions such as .tv, .co, .biz, and more.

How’s Your Cyber Hygiene?|Be Cautious With Email

Brought to you by The Information Security Club.

be-cuatious-with-emailOn regular basis we are constantly getting emails either from school, work, subscriptions, and more, but keep in mind of who we give our emails to and which emails we decide to open. If there is an email you are suspicious of or do not know who sent it to you the safe bet would be to not open it. Emails can have subject headings that are appealing to us such as “You’re a Winner!” but it is usually those emails that have malware which attack our computers. The same goes for emails sent to us with attachments. In reality we should all be cautious when we download and attach files ourselves, this also includes being aware of who is sending us these files.

The FBI states to never open or download attachments from people we do not know and to be careful with attachments that people we do know send since they can carry advanced malicious code. Emails are more susceptible to having viruses that can easily take over your computer and information without proper caution.